Category — Training

Building Evacuation Technology Takes a Step Forward: iEvac® Smoke/Fire Hood Receives NIOSH Approval!

We have to commend Ira Gurvitch President of Elmridge Protection for his determination to manufacture the best smoke/fire escape hood in the world. Although the iEvac product has been on the market since 2009 and certified well beyond ANSI 110 testing standards, the approval process with NIOSH took more time.  We’ve briefed and demonstrated the iEvac smoke and fire escape hood to many federal agencies and private sector organizations and NIOSH approvals were high on their list despite outstanding performance in the demanding ANSI 110 trials.

The following photos were taken during a live demonstration & workshop for iEvac at our local Albemarle County Fire Department’s Burn House.

Considering  the iEvac is an advanced emergency preparedness product that is specifically engineered to help you safely evacuate a smoke compromised building, we thought it worthwhile to revisit a prior blog post published on that very subject.  Enjoy!


Escape and Evacuation:
Emergency Egress from High Rise Buildings, Factories and Industrial Facilities

Whether you work in a modern skyscraper office building or live in a residential high-rise condominium apartment, you have to plan how you will safely evacuate and egress to safety in the event of an explosion or fire emergency. If you travel internationally for work, we’re confident your company’s risk management department has cautioned you against occupying a hotel room higher than floors which can typically be reached by local fire department ladder trucks.

Building fires with dense toxic smoke are not specific to high-rise structures and, in fact, can occur in any building, factory or industrial complex. A practiced building evacuation plan with posted escape routes, trained personnel and fire drills is the logical place to start. Imagine the reality of you and your co-workers traversing debris strewn floors, collapsed ceiling grids, smoke-filled darkened stairwells, and passing intensely hot areas consumed by fire as you make your escape from the building. Where are you meeting others from your office? Is everyone accounted for and has anyone been injured? Did everyone make it out? Where’s Bob? I thought he was with you?

The most likely potential danger faced by a workforce, whether as a result of industrial accident, terrorist activity or from other causes, would be fire and the highly toxic smoke and gases it generates. The next step is choosing the most appropriate and effective means of protecting people and this means finding a way to assist them in safely evacuating a building engulfed with smoke and fire. A number of safety devices have been engineered to address the issue of high-rise building evacuation.

Another element of the ICE PACK™ brand are Escape & Evacuation systems that provide persons potentially trapped by smoke and fire, with a safe and protective means to egress the building. There is no doubt that toxic smoke and fire are deadly combinations especially inside a darkened building. Being prepared and equipped to egress through and out of a building fire takes courage, determination and technology at a very personal level.

The ICE PACK™ Building Evac-Pack is a lightweight gym bag sized package that easily fits under your office desk. It is designed to provide the user with basic to advanced levels of protection, and in the most dire of circumstances, approximately 15 to 30 minutes of respiratory protection from smoke, carbon monoxide, toxic gases and radiant heat. The Building Evac-Pack’s cornerstone of protection is the advanced technology iEvac Smoke/Fire Hood. The Evac-Pack also includes eye, hand and body protection, emergency lighting and signaling equipment.

Time, tools and tenacity are what you need to escape safely!

Facta non Verba

May 18, 2012   No Comments

Emergency First Responders: The Critical Minority

In 2010, it was reported that 62.8 million adults volunteered within some organization.  FEMA estimates that equates to a contribution of 14.7 billion hours with an estimated savings of 180 billion dollars as a direct result of the effort. Prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) has, from its inception, relied heavily upon a percentage of that 62.8 million people to provide life-saving emergency medical assistance across the country.  Today, rural America depends almost exclusively on volunteers for emergency fire and medical services. Suburban America is often a mixture of volunteer and career providers. The role of volunteers in emergency response is critical to the continued operation of most of these services nationwide.


 

In 1972, the television show Emergency premiered. Regardless of entertainment value, this program had an unforeseen influence in the world of EMS. Arguably, it had a greater impact on the rapid development of prehospital emergency medical services than any other event. Viewers of the TV show wanted the same level of emergency response and capability in their own communities as they saw on television. During this same period of time many soldiers who were trained emergency medical responders were returning from Vietnam and were seeking ways to continue the use of their medical skills. The rapidly growing world of EMS provided such an opportunity.

In the early 90’s, government regulations were imposed to control the value of training and enhance professionalism of volunteer EMS personnel.  While this step greatly improved the quality of care provided by these volunteers, it also dramatically increased the amount of time required of them.

Today to become an EMT-Basic typically requires 120 hours of training with continuing education requirements after certification.  Advanced life support (known as ALS) providers have to invest an additional 140-300 hours of training depending on level obtained. The highest level in EMS, that of paramedic, requires an investment of nearly 1000 hours of training before receiving certification.

Unfortunately, it is estimated that only 1% of our country’s population are first responders. During a critical disaster, that leaves 300+ million of us waiting on a very small number of people to assist with whatever emergency situation in which we find ourselves. We would advocate more Americans investigate how they can become involved with our nation’s volunteer emergency services.  If you don’t feel you can invest 120 hours to become an EMT, consider 40 hours to become a certified first responder or even 16 hours to qualify to drive emergency vehicles. If you aren’t able to volunteer in such capacity, consider obtaining your CPR/AED and First Aid certification from the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross.  If even just a small percentage of us would take the time to improve our emergency response training, we could make a big impact on that 1 to 99 ratio of first responders!

Facta non Verba

November 16, 2011   1 Comment

Photos from the Drinking Water for Disaster Recovery technology brief

On Thursday, September 29th, ICE PACK Emergency Preparedness Systems hosted it’s monthly Emergency Preparedness Technology Briefing.  This month’s briefing was entitled Drinking Water for Disaster Recovery: Potable Water for Individuals thru “Whole of Community”.  We were pleased to host Mr. Rick Arnold, Product Development Manger of McNett Corporation, Mr. Gary Cruikshank, CEO of McNett Corporation, and Mr. Dan Ward of Hydration Technology Innovations (HTI).  These gentlemen briefed our attendees on the latest technology available in the industry for storing and creating safe drinking water for use in emergency preparedness.  Our technology briefings are open to anyone in emergency management, public safety, law enforcement, public works, security, NGO’s, GO’s, and OGA’s at no cost.  Contact us at events@ice-pack.com for more details.

Mr. Rick Arnold, McNett Corporation Product Development Manager, discusses the various ways of having safe drinking water during times of crisis.

Mr. Rick Arnold, Product Development Manager, McNett Corporation, discusses the various ways of creating or storing safe drinking water for times of crisis.

Rick talking about what kinds of products are on the market for converting stagnant water into safe, clean drinking water.

Rick discusses technology available on the market for converting non-potable water into safe, clean drinking water.

Mr. Dan Ward of HTI discusses the benefits of forward osmosis and the types of products HTI offers.

Mr. Dan Ward of Hydration Technology Innovations (HTI) discusses technological advancements of forward osmosis water purification.

Our own Troy Perry getting the participants ready for the product demonstrations.

Our own Troy Perry getting the participants ready for the product demonstrations.

The DIVVY, by Aquamira, will store 250-500 gallons of water and purify 4-5 gallons per minute.

The DIVVY, by Aquamira, will store up to 500 gallons of water (even more through connecting multiple units) and purify 5 gallons per minute.

 

Mrs. Dina Bennett of Mountain Shepherd Wilderness Survival School testing out the DIVVY.

Mrs. Dina Bennett of Mountain Shepherd Wilderness Survival School testing out the DIVVY.

The DIVVY has four dispensers for the purified water.

The DIVVY has four dispensers to facilitate rapid distribution of the purified water.

The DIVVY is completely collapsable and portable, only weighing 200 pounds (total weight).

The DIVVY is completely collapsable and portable, breaking down into 4 carrying cases and only weighing 200 pounds total.

Mr. Gary Cruikshank, CEO of Aquamira, discusses how the DIVVY purifies non-safe water.

Mr. Gary Cruikshank, CEO of McNett Corporation, discusses how the DIVVY purifies non-potable water.

Mr Dan Ward of HTI discusses their easy to use water filtration products and the benefits of forward osmosis.

Mr. Dan Ward of HTI discusses their easy-to-use water filtration products and the benefits of forward osmosis.

John Endsor and Rick Arnold discuss the importance of water during times of crisis.

John Ensor and Rick Arnold discuss the importance of water during times of crisis.

 

The Hydrowell water purifier from HTI.

The HydroWell water purifier from HTI will create a consumable drink from just about any non-potable water source at the rate of 1.5 liters per hour.

The portable 1 gallon containers for the DIVVY system are the perfect size for transporting the purified drinking water.

The portable 1-gallon containers for the DIVVY system are the perfect accessory for transporting the purified drinking water.

Gary Cruikshank discussing how easy the DIVVY works and that is needs no special tools for set up or take down.

Gary Cruikshank discussing how easy the DIVVY works, needs no special tools for set up or take down and can be assembled in less than 30 minutes.

September 30, 2011   2 Comments